Author Topic: 1,000 year long composition  (Read 3654 times)

Offline uncloned

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1,000 year long composition
« on: September 12, 2009, 23:01:41 »

Offline Really Weird Person

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1,000-year Long Competition
« Reply #1 on: September 13, 2009, 18:36:30 »
OK, Jojo, would you like me to make the challenge of beating that? That will be quite difficult indeed!
Step 1:  Get copying of pattern strings to work (as opposed to simply duplicating them) (if you havn't already) (Actually, I was going to make a post asking if you have done that anyway, but this topic distracted me because of the title.)
Step 2:  Increase the sequential limit (beyond 65,000 even, as I am not sure that even 1,040,000 patterns would last for more than 1,000 years unless they were at the slowest speed and tempo) (actually, I did that, but I do not recall the length of the song, but I would imagine that it is not 1,000 years) (although that was just a test, so the patterns were blank except for one speed and tempo effect in the first row of the first pattern)
I suppose that it might also be challenging if the "no repetition" part means just that. What I mean is that my arrangements are combinations of two or more songs, so the songs just repeat until they meet on the last pattern. Alternatively, increase the row count (to about one googol?) How many patterns would that be? Hmm, let's see here… That would be 156,250,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00
0,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000 patterns per a single pattern (assuming that all patterns are 64 rows in size)! How about to have one googol patterns fit into one… That would be 640,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,00
0,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,000,0
00 rows! I am not even sure that C++ would know what to do with that number. You would probably have to change the language completely to support a number like that!

Offline Saga Musix

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1,000 year long composition
« Reply #2 on: September 13, 2009, 18:44:33 »
...or you would "simply" have to use a library like bigint. And as much as you beg, 65,000 orders/patterns won't come back that fast - And I wonder anyway why you speak to me all the time, I never touched the limit.
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Offline Really Weird Person

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« Reply #3 on: September 13, 2009, 19:50:49 »
The reason that I talk to you about it is because [at least I thought that] you are [at least a, if not the] developer, therefore you would be the one to speak to about program features (such as the sequential limit). I actually have not gone to it either, but I keep trying. So far, the closest that I can come is 488,631 (737 * 663) (which would be 30,540 patterns (almost half!), the first 30,539 having 1,024 rows and the last one having 448) I have not found anything though (yet at least) that is exactly 65,000 (or 1,040,000) (65,000 * 16) patterns long. The songs are generally either more or less than that. Hmm, I wonder how much longer I could make the Insaniquarium suite if I tweaked it a little bit? That is a good question. Perhaps I can make it a factor of 65,000 or 1,040,000!

Offline Saga Musix

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1,000 year long composition
« Reply #4 on: September 13, 2009, 20:09:53 »
Being an OpenMPT developer does not mean that I'm familiar with all parts of the code, and I rather keep some code untouched instead of destroying ten things at the same time (but that happens anyway).

Anyway, this is far too off-topic. I've heard about that composition before - Nice to see that it's also going to be performed now. :D
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Offline Louigi Verona

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1,000 year long composition
« Reply #5 on: September 14, 2009, 05:36:16 »
Hey Chris!
Yeah, I know about this. In fact, this is what inspired my own Slow Tune project (you can see it in the Music Downloads section) and on slowclub.org it is linked.
What I like about Longplayer (and what I don't like about long compositions like As Slow As Possible) is that it has a clever algorithm opposed to just setting a repeating or simply slow speed.
In Slow Tune I want a very interesting set of algorithms. If you have ideas, do contribute!

Offline uncloned

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« Reply #6 on: September 14, 2009, 20:41:24 »
ok, I'll take a look at it.

You may like this:

go here

http://www.wnyc.org/shows/radiolab/

and scroll down on the right until the last "Time" (not Einstein Time) podcast.

It starts with Beethoven's 9th stretched to 24 hrs!!