Author Topic: Future of tracker music  (Read 541 times)

Offline Alex TEHb

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Future of tracker music
« on: August 15, 2020, 04:53:10 »
I began to write music to the 90th on ZX-Spectrum.
It was difficult to make everything that you want and to find room for it to 3 canals of the sound processor. But it was demanded by that time and possibilities of the equipment.

Then there was PC, sound cards with MIDI.
The main advantage of tracker music was that the module comprised ALL necessary for reproduction, despite the small size.

There is no need for small file size today. VSTi as before in MIDI, lie out of the module.
From true Tracker editor there was only a structure of creation of the module. It also attracts me. On the contrary, pushes away someone...

Traditionally tracker music is considered, so-called, Demo-Scene. And where other styles?
Why they so are not enough? Today in Tracker it is possible to make almost any style...

There can be a problem in weak distribution of editors? I understand that there is no advertizing because it is the free project of enthusiasts. But also on torrents I very seldom see distributions of Tracker editors.

It is unlikely, someone keeps statistics, but it would be interesting to know at least the approximate number of users of Tracker editors. 

Offline Saga Musix

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #1 on: August 15, 2020, 11:19:22 »
Quote
But also on torrents I very seldom see distributions of Tracker editors.
I know some people live by the mantra that a software doesn't exist if there's no torrent for it, but I see absolutely no reason for free software to be provided as a torrent if it's a small download anyway.

Trackers are clearly less desirable for the common user due to their steep learning curve, hence they are not so popular. I think that's inherent to the concept and not something that would be fixed by better advertising, more torrents or whatever. However, I can tell you that the number of OpenMPT users (according to our statistics) has been rising over the course of the last years. The user base is all but dead (although maybe not very vocal).
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Offline Alex TEHb

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #2 on: August 15, 2020, 11:55:48 »
It is a pity that such good tool is ignored. It seems to me, the more audience, the it is more than ideas for development...
 
AIMP Player is very widespread in Russia.
On my question of support of a MPTM format, they answered that is known only by MTM, but he died. The only thing, promised to enter in the following versions the line "Artist" at the Tags display in the IT files. (Before there was only a line "Name of a Song").

Offline Saga Musix

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #3 on: August 15, 2020, 16:35:28 »
It is a pity that such good tool is ignored. It seems to me, the more audience, the it is more than ideas for development...
Quite honestly, I am happy with the amount of users we have. We already have more ideas than we can ever implement, and while some people claim that more users would automatically attract more developers, I am convinced the opposite is true: The more users an open-source project has, the worse the user-to-developer ratio usually is.
Currently we basically have two developers and several thousand active users. If we now had a million users, this wouldn't mean that suddenly we had a thousand active developers. We'd probably have ten more developers but a million more ideas how to "improve" the software.

Regarding external software, I can only recommend for them to use libopenmpt to play MPTM files. There's just too many little details to get right because the format is largely backwards-compatible to previous OpenMPT versions, and libopenmpt is pretty much the only way to play every MPTM file the way it was intended to be played.
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Offline Alex TEHb

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #4 on: August 16, 2020, 03:26:09 »
I am completely satisfied with OpenMPT and its support.
There is not enough, exactly, audience of users, a variety of styles.

Alas, did not save the link, once was on the Polish website. There were more rock compositions.
And there could be also classical music, a techno, industrial, new age, etc. If it was more users...

Looking at mod-archive, it seems that except electro-house nothing else in the trekerny editor can be made.
But same not so!
Everything rests to users and availability of various instruments.

Therefore started this conversation.
What is necessary to interest people?

Offline Saga Musix

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #5 on: August 16, 2020, 12:39:44 »
Quote
Looking at mod-archive, it seems that except electro-house nothing else in the trekerny editor can be made.
While it is true that most people are probably making electornic music with trackers, ModArchive features a much wider variety of music. The problem isn't that it doesn't exit, it's rather than it's very hard to organize and structure all this data. There was a big metal tracking scene in the late 90s, and lots of its output can be found on ModArchive (and more is to be added in the following months).

Quote
What is necessary to interest people?
I'd say that they themselves have to be ready to live with the idiosyncratic nature of how trackers do certain things. As said, there is a steep learning curve compared to regular sequencers, one has to be motivated to take this learning curve. Why learn for years how to make authentic-sounding metal music in a tracker when it's so much easier to just record 4 tracks from real instruments into a DAW?
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Offline LPChip

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #6 on: August 17, 2020, 08:30:10 »
To add to what already has been said, when writing music, its really a matter of using the tool you are most comfortable in. When it comes to abilities between a tracker and a sequencer, nowadays they are mostly equal. By that I mean, if one knows the tools well enough, they can make the exact same song in both pieces of software, but it may go easier in one vs the other.

It is this nuance that makes it so that a tracker is not that widely used. I do use OpenMPT, but I also use a sequencer but for different type of projects. When creating a song, my methodology is different for a tracker vs a sequencer. In a sequencer, I'll record my midi notes using a keyboard while I hit the record button and do it track by track. In a tracker, I work pattern to pattern and usually work in groups of 4 patterns.

The biggest reason for me to go for a tracker over a sequencer, is if I want to create a module, for example for a demo project. Another reason could be to create chiptunes, something that is so much easier in a tracker.

So... it really does matter what one would want to accomplish whether or not their choice of software is determined on beforehand.

When it comes to modern music, one should keep in mind that a tracker works really well when you are one person composing the entire music. If you are in a band/group and you want to compose as a group, a tracker will make things so much harder than a sequencer by definition alone because you then have performers. They just want to play their instrument, so all you need to do is hit record. One could even just hit record and have a jam session, and then one person uses whatever was played to construct the real song, something that is much harder to do with a tracker and external sound recorder.
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Offline Alex TEHb

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Re: Future of tracker music
« Reply #7 on: August 20, 2020, 10:56:42 »
Decided to sum up the results.

Reflected on future Tracker music, and it is necessary to compare it to sequencer.
It is not absolutely correct, but itself arises...

= Possibilities of tracker and sequencer, approximately, identical.

- Certainly, to learn to write tracker music it is more difficult (but not on many), than in a sequencer.
- Work with VST in sequencers, perhaps, is thought more over and is supported better.
- It is more difficult to find ready instuments for the tracker.

+ Free Tracker.
+ Tracker does not demand knowledge of musical notation (however, with arrival of Piano Roll the sequencers made up for this point).

Sequencers are more attractive, but thousands of people still work in trackers.
What keeps us in it? Habit?
Then, the majority of trackerman - people very adult...
But me, apparently, as among us it is a lot of youth...