Author Topic: [ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)  (Read 3918 times)

Offline Louigi Verona

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« on: August 09, 2009, 20:38:21 »
At the moment I am working on a record which would consist of three tracks. Each track would be an exploration of an atmosphere. Technically it is done with Tape Loops and its random play function - the music is only started by the composer but then exists by itself. All the loops used I make beforehand.

Each track I can write down on a paper - a list of loops with exact parameters of randomplay - random play period, volume, panning, etc.
So the idea is to create a complex environment out of simple elements which would interact with each other.

In this particular track I have used an experimental function, called Clustering, which basically allows you to trigger the deck with randomplay a defined amount of times after which the track will pause for a defined period. By using that function on, say, several loops of piano notes, you can create a sound "cluster", which would play, then stop, then start again. That would help to have a development and change in a soundscape that would otherwise be homogeneous.

Elements: Deep Space
http://www.louigiverona.com/files/element1-3_clean.mp3 (33 Mb)

This is one of the versions of the track and it's about 34 minutes long.

Offline Sam_Zen

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #1 on: August 10, 2009, 00:13:27 »
Well, you're progressing fast in the handling of Tape Loops..!
This 'clustering' is a very nice idea.
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Offline uncloned

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #2 on: August 10, 2009, 01:11:58 »
LV

What would you think of combining a very slow moving "game of life" algorithm to control the triggering of loops?  I would think you'd have to put in modified rules because you'd want to make self sustaining easier to accomplish.

This is nice - this, from what you described, is a type aleatoric music.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aleatoric_music

which of course removes the composer from the music to varying degrees.

This is a nice piece and the initial impression was *wow* - after 15 minutes though I started to lose attention.

Offline Louigi Verona

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #3 on: August 10, 2009, 04:18:12 »
Chris:

Yep, that sounds interesting! It would be perfectly possible when I realize the main app concept and mixing - atm technically it is not possible. But perhaps such a thing can even be built into the app. I would have to really think of changing the rules to accommodate the music better.

Aleatoric music, yep! This seems to be it. And I not only very much enjoy the idea of removing the role of the composer from the lead, I also see that only such kind of a method allows to create interesting soundscapes, as a lot of them depend on a feeling of randomity, spontaneity - something that a human composer finds very difficult to do. And after having worked like that I now think that Steve Roach does not put all the pads in place himself, I think he uses a similar aleatoric approach.

As for losing attention - this, I believe, is a normal reaction. With this piece I think the desirable effect for me would be putting ones mind to conciliation, make a person in peace with oneself.

Offline Sam_Zen

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #4 on: August 11, 2009, 01:03:07 »
Of course I somewhere lost attention too, but this is not due to some 'dullness' of the piece.
Maybe it's the result of getting in a peaceful state. After a while the mind starts wandering, free.

It could have the academic label 'aleatoric'.
I don't mind what, but it is a 'rendering process' with no influence by the author whatsoever. In realtime that is.

So the outcome is defined only by some pre-set conditions, or choosing a formula, like with fractals.

Before adding a 'growing life' formula. I would prefer more options for straight logical modifications.
I mean sync-pulse counter/dividers, so e.g. a sample would be triggered every 7 master-pulses.
Or Boolean things like AND or OR among the several units.
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Offline uncloned

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #5 on: August 11, 2009, 01:29:46 »
+1 on Sam's ideas from me as well.

That would turn tapeloops into a meta-sampler of sorts (I think)

Offline Louigi Verona

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #6 on: August 11, 2009, 04:03:32 »
Great ideas guys, all of that should be implemented.

I found a good free software library - PortAudio. That's what Audacity uses. I am thinking of switching to it and starting the one application thing. I am not sure how fast that'll go though since PortAudio seems to be a non-user friendly library and unlike BASS seems to require a lot of things to start up and operate. However, I will try it.

Offline bvanoudtshoorn

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #7 on: August 13, 2009, 02:16:45 »
LV: Have you considered writing a simple API for tape loops? That way, people could write apps in their language of choice that would interact with it. It would mean, for example, that people could write python scripts that would trigger loops in various ways.

The possibilities for 'self-composing' music are really quite endless, and I like Clones' idea of combining a generative music algorithm with an existing particulate 'life' algorithm.

I would actually be interested in seeing the results of a slightly different 'life' algorithm, with free-moving particles. You could, for example, have 'male' and 'female' particles, and, when they interact to produce offspring,
- The average of their ages determines the volume;
- Their x/y coordinates select the loop, given that their 2d space is divided into a 'grid' of loop squares;
- Perhaps even have their angular velocities determine pitch or length or number of loops or whatever.
Just imagine what you could do if you hooked all of this up to a realtime synth... :D

If you use Conway's game of life, for example, though, you do have the benefit of being able to set up a musical 'score' by setting the board up in a particular way -- this way, you can save particular performances. If, however, you use a more randomised algorithm, (I admit, the one I was thinking of above was one I made a while ago in Processing), you would lose this ability.

It'd be awesome if you *could* release an API for tape loops - then I could go and have a play with this myself when I get the chance. :D

=====

Ok, enough about the technology. The music.

I like it. The individual loops (as far as I can distinguish them) are well-produced and clear, and fit together well to form a whole. Although it's in a similar vein, this track is actually quite dissimilar to some of your other work; I'm not sure I can put my finger on exactly why, but I'd probably say that it's the lack of apparent structure caused by your 'hands-off' approach in the actual performance of the track.

Offline Louigi Verona

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[ambient/drone] Elements: Deep Space (mp3)
« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2009, 05:19:53 »
Quote
Have you considered writing a simple API for tape loops?


You have to understand that three months ago I did not know how to code a desktop application, so while this suggestion sounds great, I am not sure I am able to do this just now.

On the other hand, the source code is quite available, so anyone can take up the challenge.

Quote
I'd probably say that it's the lack of apparent structure caused by your 'hands-off' approach in the actual performance of the track


Exactly. Humans are very bad with randomness.

By the way, with Tape Loops I am able to write down a composition.